Friday, May 19, 2017

Thule Roof Rack, Seasucker and Trike

I sold my trike carrying Ford Escape and we're down to only one car. I wanted a way to carry the 700 on top of our Ford C-Max. It's not always practical to stuff it inside the C-Max. Here's pics of what I came up with.

The flush mount Thule Roof Rack is installed so my front tires fit nicely in between the racks. A SeaSucker suction cup holds the rear tire in place. Note that I put my rear rack on my 700 in preparation for rides through wine country. You never know what you'll end up coming back with after a visit to the Central Coast wineries. More on that later.

A closer look.

Hook and loop straps (the same DiNotte straps that hold my batteries) hold the tires to the Thule Rack. For long trips I use heavy duty straps with buckles.

SeaSucker rear tire holder. I don't have enough faith in suction cups to do the entire job, front and back, of holding my trike down. No harm will be done, other then a little bouncing around, if the rear cup looses suction. 

Enough room for two trikes. Just need an extra rear suction cup.


By old Ford Escape with my old Catrike Expedition on top.



Monday, April 24, 2017

Harmony

Taking a break in Harmony on the Central Coast

Old Post Office

Harmony Cellars Winery

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

I Don't Like Guardrails

I'm always scanning for places to bail out in the event of an errant car or truck. If there is ever a time I might feel a bit uncomfortable it's when riding next to a guardrail. Fortunately where I ride there are few guardrails and wide shoulders. Also cyclists are a common sight along the Central Coast. Safety in numbers.


Thursday, April 13, 2017

By the Bay

Hanging in San Fransisco. I would not ride a trike or bike in the heart of this City. Riding a trike on the downtown streets of SF would be a real challenge to say the least.


Saturday, April 1, 2017

Down to One Car

Down to one car. At least for now.

I'm getting good at stuffing the 700 into our Ford C-Max plug in. The plug in C-Max has a rather large battery tucked away in the trunk. It would be easier without the battery taking up so much room but I've managed to make it work. After becoming confident in my "stuffing the trike into a small car skills" I sold the Ford Escape that has severed me well for 10 years.

I'm considering an all small electric vehicle (or possibly a e-assist trike) for myself for getting around town. For now we'll just give it a go with one car. 



Goodbye old beast of burden.
Picture from January 2011
Byron's been living on his own for the last three years while studying film. And Leili, now 17, has been living in San Francisco for the last 2 years and dancing with the SF Ballet. So it's just Carrie and me and no need for 2 cars.


Saturday, March 18, 2017

New Low Gear

After a year of cycling on the Central Coast it has become clear that I need at least one more low gear for some of the steeper roads of the Central Coast. I replaced my small 28t ring with a 26t small ring. This required a change in the large chainring from a 52t to a 50t and taking two links off the chain to maintain good chain tension. Even with that done and using a 36/11 cassette the rear derailleur is maxed out. Going small (small chainring)/small (small cassette cog) leaves the chain sagging a bit. But since there is no reason to go small/small it's not a concern.

I added a inner chainring guard to keep the chain in line when dropping down from the 39t to the 26t. Under normal riding conditions with a well tuned derailleur dropping the chain from the 39t to the 26t works fine. However experience has taught me that when rattling around on rough roads the chain can drop off the small chainring while shifting. Therefore the addition of the inner chainring guard. The extra weight is minimal.

The outer guard is to protect me from poking myself and Carrie when the boom and chainring is between the front seats when the trike is loaded in the car. It also serves a second purpose-it shuts down the roadies who like to complain about the dangers of getting impaled on the exposed chainring.

The sacrifice I make on the high end will be made up on the low end with happier legs on the climbs.

Inner chain guard (Volae Granny Guard), 26t, 39t, 50t and Outer chain guard (Driveline)

The small Salsa (on left) and Blackspire (in middle) chainrings have an asymmetrical offset of the teeth. It's just enough to cause the chain to drop or get wedged between chainrings depending on the way you install them. The Vuelta (on right) chainring teeth are centered on the chainring and allow for smooth shifting on the FSA crank.



Crank mounted, two chain links removed, derailleur lowered, cable adjusted and chain lubed. Ready to ride.


Using a 35/622  rear tire (for rougher roads)


Using a 28/622  rear tire





Sunday, March 12, 2017

Kojak and Chip Seal

In my last post from March 10th I stated that I usually avoid riding north of Cambria on Highway 1 because of the chip seal. Well I rode north for the the second time in a row. I wanted to try the ride using the Kojak on the rear at 60psi on the rough road (see Speed, Comfort and Tires 8/3/16). Using the Kojak on the rear smoothed out the chip seal a bit. But chip seal (even though mitigated by CalTrans) is still chip seal. There's no doubt it wears you out faster. But the Central Coast is beautiful and worth an occasional ride North of Cambria.


Kojak 35/622 on the rear while keeping the Durano 28/406s on the front.

Destination ahead, San Simeon Pier.

San Simeon Pier, Time for a snack.